Glass

Witbier
Wheat beer
Weizenbier
Weissbier
Weißbier

Glass

I was introduced to the delights of Weizenbier (a.k.a. Weissbier) when I was working at Schloß Elmau in 1984, and as I found it difficult to obtain any outside Bavaria I became quite obsessive ever since about promoting its virtues to anyone I encountered. Is it coincidence that over the last few years a veritable "wheat beer boom" has arisen, and even British supermarkets have started to stock "own brand" versions? I wonder! Anyway, here is a brief description...

Varieties

Whereas most beer is made out of barley, Weizenbier is made out of wheat. This gives it a much stronger flavour -- those into such things often refer to it as 'cloves, banana and bubble-gum'(!) -- as well as more fizz (although I'm not really sure of the reason for the latter). Having said this, it is generally not 100% wheat, but (in Bavaria) generally somewhere around 66% wheat and 33% barley (sometimes 50/50). Other wheat beers include the 'sour' Berliner Weisse (33% wheat / 66% barley, often drunk in a semi-spherical glass mixed with brightly coloured syrups such as raspberry or woodruff) and the Belgian Witbier ("white beer"; the Flemish for "wheat beer" is Tarwebier; the French term "Bière Blanche" is also used), while many of the Belgian Lambic beers contain fruit in addition to wheat.

In Sachsen, particularly Leipzig, a nearly-lost traditional wheat beer called Gose is making a comeback. There are many similarities with Berliner Weisse, including the manufacturing process and the habit of adding syrups (raspberry or woodruff to make the "Sonnenschirm" = parasol, Curaçao to make the "Blaue Engel" = blue angel, cherry brandy to make a "Frauenfreundliche" = woman-friendly (!) version, and Allasch caraway liqueur to make the "Regenschirm" = umbrella). The first post-war batch was in fact made in a Berliner Weisse factory. Gose has a unique shape of long-necked bottle (originally uncapped: the thick froth was supposed to keep out any germs), and vase-like 0.8 litre glasses. The 1824 Döllnitzer Ritterguts Gose is available in the Gosenschenke "Ohne Bedenken" and now a second Gose pub has been created through the restoration of the Bayerischer Bahnhof station.

Gueuze is a Belgian lambic beer, which tastes 'sour' in a similar way to Gose and Berliner Weisse, but with the following differences:

  Gose Gueuze
Age c. 1000 A.D., extinct 1966-86 Brewed since 1900
Main antibiotic ingredients Salt, coriander Tannin from hops
Yeast Added Natural
Served in Uncapped, long-necked bottles Capped bottles
Made from Single type Blend of 1-year (fizz) and 2- or 3-year (taste) lambics
Purported origin of name Town Goslar Norman word for wheat
The name comes from Goslar, where it originated (first mentioned in around 1000 A.D.), and is possibly the ancestor of Gueuze: see below. ????? differs from modern Gose in that Gose uses coriander and salt (probably to avoid infection), while Gueuze relies on hops. , the only fruit-free Belgian white beer According to the Cantillon brewery, wheat is generally used to add sour notes to a beer, but contains much less starch (=> sugar to be fermented) than barley, which makes it hard to create a 100% wheat beer.

Another tradition does however appear to have been lost: the Breyhan or Broyhan beer from North Germany. An entry from Zedler's lexikon in 1733 says that it was made from malted wheat and hops, and often used in soup(!). It was named after Cordt Breyhanen, a Hamburg brewer, who moved to Hannover and recreated his Hamburg beer there on 31 May 1526. See also Old German Beer Styles.

Brewers in many other countries have also produced wheat beers (see below), which are often tasty and more interesting than conventional brews, but in my mind none really come up to the Bavarian ones. Recently some American brewers have created very strong wheat beers named "wheat wine" (in the "barley wine" mould), although this could cause confusion as there some winemaking enthusiasts also make "wheat wine" (which is totally different, and probably closer to the Weizenwein described in a few old German recipe books... while Weißwein is of course something entirely separate again).

Even within Bavaria there are many different types: Hefe-weizen (yeast is left in, which makes the beer cloudy and improves the taste), Kristall-weizen (crystal clear: a slice of lemon is sometimes added, although I have recently witnessed a few Bavarians even adding lemon to Hefe-weizen), Leicht (light = low alcohol / low calory), Weizen-bock (double strength), Dunkel-weizen (darker), and even Dunkel-weizen-bock. I have also found organic, "smoked", non-alcoholic and shandy varieties. German shandy made with non-Weizen beers is normally called Radler (meaning "cyclist"; recently even some Germans call it "biker"). This name was apparently coined in the summer of 1922 when Franz Xaver Kugler, the owner of a mountain hut, found the cyclists were drinking him dry so diluted his beer with lemonade, claiming this to be a new drink he had invented specially to allow them to return home safely. Weizen shandy on the other hand is called "Ruß" (Russian), a name coined a few years earlier (in November 1919, at the time of the November Revolution). In this case, it was a Munich landlord (at the Mathaserkeller) who found himself in danger of being drunk dry by communist sympathizers, so stretched his (Weizen) beer in the same way.

Other variants (see also www.abseits.de/biermix.htm) include Colaweizen (50% Weizen, 50% Cola; also known as Flieger, or by the "politically incorrect" name Neger-Ruß), Frühstück Weizen ('breakfast' Weizen, with orange juice), Hollodri (with elderberry juice), Kirschweizen (with sour cherry juice), Pfirsichweizen (with peach juice), Bananenweizen (75/25; with banana juice; also known as "Elephant Sperm"!), Potsdamer Weizen (Berliner Weisse mixed with a conventional light-coloured beer such as Pilsner, but served in a Weizen glass), and Berliner Weisse Blau (with Blue Curacao). Even stranger combinations doubtless exist outside Germany / Bavaria, although in many cases it seems the brewers just add fruit flavours etc. while making the beer, rather than mixing afterwards.

All Bavarian Weizen are served in the same distinctive shape of glass, which is quite fragile (I've broken them when pouring, and even bitten through one!) so when toasting somebody you should clink the heavy base of the glasses together instead of the top. I have been told that the glass was made this shape in an attempt to suppress the Weizen's froth, although I suspect it is rather designed to promote a good head. Beer in Bottles (http://www.beer-in-bottles.co.uk/g_germ.htm) used to offer a wide range of Weizenbier glasses, but seems to have disappeared now. Straubs (in the USA) have a large variety (the Americans seem to call them all Steins), and there are some nice examples of Weizenbier Krüge (stone mugs, sometimes with lids) at the First Original Bavarian Shop on the Internet. Here is a picture of two unusual Weizenbier mugs I have myself: one with Schloß Neuschwanstein and the motto "Deutschland ist schön", the other with "Bayern" and a picture of mad King Ludwig.

Homebrew label
Homebrew Weizen label

 

Pouring

Draught Weizenbier used to be quite rare (I'd even say non-existent) in Germany and Bavaria, although I did find some in New Zealand of all places. Since around 1995 however it seems that the boom in the West has been mirrored inside Germany and Bavaria, and draught Weizenbier is becoming increasingly common (which coincidentally means that 300 ml glasses are becoming quite common too). I have heard that it is quite popular in Milwaukee, Wisconsin -- for whatever reason. Cans are still comparatively rare: almost inevitably Weizenbier comes in half-litre bottles, which are all basically the same shape and thus easily recyclable.
[Having said this, I find Schöfferhofer bottles irritatingly thin -- and some firms favour bottles with long, thin necks, which means that their made-to-measure glasses don't work well with other firms' bottles.]

Pouring the beer is a wonderful "traditional" art. The glass should be rinsed out with cold water (some bars now have introduced a technological solution whereby an inverted Weizenbier glass can be pressed down onto a nozzle and rinsed instantaneously), then held over the mouth of the bottle (without drying it) and both inverted -- preferably over a sink, as without practice it is very easy to let the foam spurt out wildly. Professional barmen can however pour two at the same time without even looking ...

As the beer gushes out the bottle should be lifted up slowly, and when nearly empty should be withdrawn completely and swung around in one hand to capture the last grains of yeast, which are then poured in vigorously to cloud the beer (with non-filtered varieties). It should also have a good, firm head, although it is easy to tilt the glass too much so that the head takes on the glass' shape. Note: this is the school of Weizen-pouring which I learned, and there is much debate over the correct method of performing each step!

Weizenbier book
The definitive book on wheat beer,
available at Amazon US UK DE/AT FR JP

 

Brewers

When I started this page I had no idea how many breweries were producing Weizenbier in Bavaria (let alone elsewhere), except that I'd sampled around 100 varieties (judging from the labels I collected: click on any "pic" link below to bring up a picture in a separate window). Recently, however, I have come to realize that the number is probably well over 1000, and it is futile to attempt to make any definitive list without getting totally obsessive. For example, one collector says he has over 1600 Weizenbier glasses from 900 breweries, and the photographs at weizenbierglas.de are equally awesome. I am therefore no longer going to update this list that often, although I hope it still gives some idea of the scope available throughout the world. Various professionally or commercially-run websites also have large lists (complete with "tasting notes" etc.; e.g. Ohhh My Head and Beer Advocate) and the number of hits for Weizenbier / Weißbier / Wheat Beer / Wheat Ale etc. on the Internet is increasing daily, so there is no shortage of information for those who want it -- unlike in 1995, when this was effectively the first page of its kind. Also, there seems to be a trend for local brewers (microbreweries, brewpubs, etc.) in the UK and USA to produce different beers every year, including the occasional Weizen. Many of these are only available draught, at the brewer's own establishment or beer festivals, so while I welcome the fact that this is happening, attempting to list all their names is a waste of time. Another problem is that many beers are now being given "brand names" rather than simply using the brewery name as in the past. Anyway, the end result is that Weizenbier is now much easier to obtain throughout much of the world, so my original purpose in setting up this page seems to have been accomplished.

If you notice any errors in the list, or unusual additions (e.g. strange ingredients, new countries) please let me know (see "Contact me" at the foot of this page) ... especially if you can provide me with samples of any wheat beers I've not yet tried! :-)

Bavaria (and some from Germany):

  1. Aktien-Brauerei Vilsbiburg (Hefe, Dunkel, Light; see also Mühlviertler under Austria below)
  2. Alpirsbacher (Kristall / Hefe)
  3. Altenmünster (Steinweizen / Hefe / Kristall) pic
  4. Andechs (Hefe / Dunkel) pic
  5. Arcobräeu (Hefe / Dunkel / Light)
  6. Arnstädter Urweizen (from former DDR)
  7. Aufsesser (Hefe) by Rothenbach in Aufseß
  8. Augustiner (Hefe) pic (N.B. the silver label proved almost impossible to scan!)
  9. Ayinger (Leichte Bräu-Weisse = low-ish alcohol / Ur-Weisse = Dunkel)
  10. Bamberger Kaiserdom (Hefe / Kristall)
  11. Bauer's (Hefe / Gose)
  12. Bavaria (Hefe / Bayerisch Weizen = Kristall / Dunkel / Ruß; also 100% wheat Weitz)
  13. Berliner Kindl (Berliner Weisse) pic
  14. Bischofshof ("Malteser" Hefe)
  15. Blaue Loewe (Hefe)
  16. Boltens Urweizen (Hefe) pic
  17. Bräuwastl (Hefe)
  18. Brauerkrone (Hefe)
  19. Braun's Weisse
  20. Bürger Bräu Edel-Weise (by Bürger Bräu Hof, Hof)
  21. Choriner (also organic; from former DDR)
  22. Darmstädter (Hefe / "Whizz" = Weizen + peach)
  23. Dingslebener (from former DDR, but privately owned throughout)
  24. Dinkel Acker ("Weissbier") -- its Weizen now seems to be a separate brand, Sanwald (see below)
  25. Distelhäuser (Dunkel)
  26. Eber by Sonnenbräu in Ebermannstadt
  27. Eichbaum (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel)
  28. Einsiedler (Hefe / Dunkel; from former DDR)
  29. Eittinger Fischer ("Fest-Weisse" / "Weisse")
  30. EKU (Erste Kulmbacher Actienbrauerei) (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel) in Kulmbach
  31. Erdinger (Non-alcoholic / Light / Kristall / Hefe / "Schneeweisse" / "Champ" / Dunkel / Dunkel-bock (Pikantus) / Winter; also Hefe and Dunkel cans) pic
  32. Erfurter (from former DDR)
  33. Ettaler (Dunkel)
  34. Fässla Weizla
  35. Falkensteiner Cola Weizen by Jahn-Bräu, Ludwigsstadt
  36. Falter (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel) by Schloßbrauerei Alois Falter, Unterkotzau bei Hof
  37. FIPS from Deggendorf; now bought out by Arcobräu
  38. Flensburger (Hefe: 33cl)
  39. Flötzinger (Dunkel)
  40. Franken Bräu (Kristall / "Jubiläum"); Mitwitz
  41. Franziskaner (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel / "Franziskus" Bock / "Club-Weisse; also draught) pic (made by Spaten)
  42. Freudenberger (Hefe)
  43. Fürnheimer (Kristall / Hefe)
  44. Fürstabt (by Allgäuer Brauhaus, Kempten)
  45. Fürther (Hefe)
  46. Glaabsbräu (Hefe / Dunkel / Kristall)
  47. Gold (Hefe / Kristall)
  48. Golden (Hefe); by Golden Getränke in Altötting
  49. Gold Ochsen (Hefe / Dunkel / Kristall / Leicht)
  50. Greif (Hefe)
  51. Gruenbach (a specialist Weizenbier brewery with many varieties and a good web site)
  52. Gutmann (Hefe / Dunkel / Leicht / Bock) pic
  53. Hacker-Pschorr (/ Pschorr-Bräu) (Hefe / Dunkel) pic
  54. Haigerlocher (Hefe / Dunkel) by Zöhrlaut Schloßbrauerei in Haigerloch
  55. Hauf (Hefe / Dunkel)
  56. Hebendanz Export (?)
  57. Heller Bamberg (Rauchweizen)
  58. Herrenhaeuser (unusually, a North German firm)
  59. Herrnbrä (Kristall)
  60. Hirsch
  61. Hoesl Resi (Hefe / Dunkel / Leicht / Kristall / Hochzeit [!])
  62. Hofbräuhaus München (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel)
  63. Hofmühl (Leicht)
  64. Holzkirchner Weisse Oberbrau
  65. Hopf (Hefe / Dunkel / "Eisweissbier")
  66. Huber Weisses (Hefe, Dunkel, Kristall, Light, 'Fresh' [small iced bottles]) pic
  67. Hufeisen Keller
  68. Ingobräu Edel
  69. Irseer Kloster-Urweiße
  70. Julius Echter (Hefe / Dunkel) from Würzburg
  71. Kaiserdom Weizenland (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel) in Bamberg
  72. Kaltenberg ("Weissbier" / Dunkel)
  73. Kapuziner (non-alcoholic / Hefe / Kristall / Light / Dunkel / Winter; also cans & kegs of 0.5, 5, 30 and 50 litres!) in Kulmbach
  74. Karg (Hefe / Bock / "Schwarzer Woipertinger") pic
  75. Keiler (Dunkel) by Stumpf in Lohr
  76. Kitzmann (Hefe)
  77. Koenigsee (Hefe / "Weisse")
  78. Krans
  79. Kraus (Hefe) in Hirschaid
  80. Kuchlbauer (Hefe / Bock / "Alte Liebe" = Dunkel)
  81. Kuppler (from Leipzig, but not a Gose; sold in 2 litre flagons)
  82. Laufer (Hefe / Light)
  83. Lausitzer (Hefe; from former DDR)
  84. Lauterbacher (Hefe / Dunkel)
  85. Leikeim (Schwarze Weiße) in Altenkunstadt
  86. Leinleitertal
  87. Lichtenauer by Hauff in Lichtenau
  88. Löwenbräu (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel ("Schwarze Weisse"); also cans)
  89. Maisacher Sedlmayer (Hefe)
  90. Maisel Bamberg (Hefe / Dunkel) Note that this is totally separate from the other Maisel below!
  91. Maisel Bayreuth (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel / "Furst" / Winter) pic
  92. Maltezer
  93. Martini, draught
  94. Meinel (Hefe)
  95. Michel Mahr's (Hefe / Bock) in Bamberg
  96. Michelstädter Rathausbräu
  97. Mueller (Dunkel)
  98. Münchner Kindl (Hefe) pic
  99. Neckarmueller (Hefe) pic
  100. Neumarkter Lammsbraeu (Hefe) pic
  101. Oberdorfer (Hefe / Dunkel) by Sailer in Marktoberdorf
  102. Oechsner
  103. Oettinger (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel)
  104. Original Bayrisch (Hefe, Kristall, Ur-weiße; formerly made by Will-Bräu, now part of Hochstift
  105. Ott'n (by Leicht in Memmelsdorf)
  106. Palmbräu Rezent
  107. Park (Hefe / Dunkel / Weizen-Radler / "Sunny" with fizzy apple juice)
  108. Patrizier (Dunkel / "Black Rider" = Light Colaweizen)
  109. Paulaner (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel; also cans) pic
  110. Pfister
  111. Pinkus (Hefe: organic)
  112. Plank (Bock, Heller Bock)
  113. Der Postillion (Hefe) by Karl Meyer in Nesselwang
  114. Postkutscher (from former DDR)
  115. Pott's (Hefe; small bottles but nice!)
  116. Püls-Bräu (in Weismain)
  117. Preminger Weissbier
  118. Prinzregent Luitpold (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel; also in 30 litre kegs; not easy to outclass the Prince of Bavaria's own brewery!)
  119. Privat (Hefe)
  120. Pyraser (Hefe)
  121. Quenzer (Hefe)
  122. Qowaz (65% Kristall, 35% Cola, lemongrass) by Fürstenberg
  123. Raitenhaslach (Hefe / Dunkel)
  124. Rauchenfels (Steinweizen)
  125. Rawetzer (by Nothaft, Marktredwitz)
  126. Reiler
  127. Rhöner (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel; from former DDR)
  128. Riedenburger (organic)
  129. Ritter (Hefe / Dunkel / Light)
  130. Rothaus (Hefe)
  131. Rother Öko (Hefe / "Ur-Weizen" = Dunkel?; organic?) from Hausen
  132. Saalfelder Gaudi-Weizen (Hefe; from former DDR)
  133. Sandler (Dunkel)
  134. Sanwald (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel / Light / "Blue" = Light Colaweizen; also cans)
  135. Schäff (Dunkel) from Treuchtlingen
  136. Schalchner by Schwendl from Tacherting
  137. Scherdel (Hefe / Dunkel)
  138. Schlenkerla (Rauchbier Weizen)
  139. Schlossbräu (Hefe)
  140. Schmidt's Heiner (Hefe / Dunkel / Light) by Zeltbräu, Hof
  141. Schmucker (Hefe)
  142. Schneider Weisse (Non-alcoholic / Kristall / Hefe / "Wiesen" / "Original" / Dunkelbock/Doppelbock/Eisbock (Aventinus) / Bock; also draught Weizenhell); world's oldest Weißbier brewery pic
  143. Schnitzei by Schnitzlbaumer from Traunstein
  144. Schöfferhofer (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel / "Weizen Lemon") pic
  145. Schultheiss (Berliner Weisse)
  146. Sigel Kloster (Kristall)
  147. Söldenauer Schloss
  148. Sonnen-Weisse (Hefe; from former DDR)
  149. Speicher (from former DDR; no longer makes Hefe-Weizen)
  150. Spessarträuber (Hefe) pic
  151. Spezial
  152. St Georgen Weisse Ritter / Schwarze Ritter (Dunkel)
  153. St Scheidmantel (Hefe); Coburg
  154. Staffelberg (Hefe) pic
  155. Staudenweizen (Hefe)
  156. Steinhaeuser ("Weizenbier")
  157. Straubinger (Hefe / Light Colaweizen)
  158. Stuttgarter Hofbräu (Kristall)
  159. Thurn und Taxis (Kristall / Hefe)
  160. Traunsteiner Hofbräu
  161. Tucher (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel / Light; also cans)
  162. Unertl (Hefe) pic
  163. Urbanus (in Pfaffenhofen): champagne-flavour Weizen, due to the yeast, not any mixing
  164. Urgäuger Weizen
  165. Valentins (Kristall / Hefe)
  166. Veldensteiner
  167. Waldhaus (Hefe; from former DDR)
  168. Weihenstephan (Kristall / Hefe / Dunkel / "Bernsteinweisse"); from the oldest brewery in the world ... pic
  169. Weiherer
  170. Weißbräuhaus (Dunkel / Kristall) by Herrnbräu in Ingolstadt
  171. Weisserfranke (Hefe) pic
  172. Weisser Kaiser (by Kaiserhof, Kronach)
  173. Weizen ("Gold" / Dunkel)
  174. Weizenthaler (non-alcoholic) pic
  175. Weltenburger (Hefe / Dunkel / "Anno 1050"; also draught)
  176. Wieninger (Hefe)
  177. Wolfshöher (Dunkel) from Neunkirchen
  178. Zoetler (Hefe, Dunkel). Comes from Retternberg, the "southermost brewery village in Germany".
  179. Zwiefalter Kloster (Kristall)

Belgium:

  1. Albert Heijn Witbier
  2. Blanche de Bruges / Brugs Tarwebier pic
  3. Blanche de Brunehaut
  4. Blanche de Bruxelles / Brusselse Witte by Brasserie Lefebre (Quenast)
  5. Blanche de Fantôme (draught)
  6. Blanche de Namur
  7. Blanche des Flandres
  8. Blanche des Honnelles
  9. Blanche des Neiges
  10. Blanche du Hainaut Biologique
  11. Dentergems pic
  12. Dupont Blanche de Hainaut (organic)
  13. Florigaarden Witbier
  14. Floris
  15. GB Wit Bier, Brussels
  16. Grisette Blanche by Brasserie Friart (Le Roeulx)
  17. Hoegaarden (White / Special; also draught) pic
  18. Karlsquell Witte by Brouwerij "De Kruydtmolen anno 1821" (Houthem)
  19. Kuurnse Witte
  20. Limburgse Witte
  21. Mater
  22. Miroir speciale (from Jette)
  23. Riva Blanche
  24. St Josef Limburgse Wit
  25. Sillenrieux Sara (buckwheat: don't think that really counts, but anyway ...)
  26. Steendonk (also draught) pic
  27. Student by Brasserie Lefebre (Quenast)
  28. Timmerman's Blanche Wit by Brouwerij Timmermans (Itterbeek)
  29. Vlaamsch pic
  30. Watou Wit by N.V. van Eecke (Watou) pic
  31. Weesper Wit by Gooische Bierbrouwerij De Horste
  32. Witkap Stimulo
  33. Wittekerke by Brouwerij Bavik (Bavikhove) pic
  34. Witte Wieven Witbier

Netherlands:

  1. Albinootje by Brouwerij Sint-Servattumus (Schijndel)
  2. De Leckere Witbier (organic) by Brouwerij "De Leckere" (Utrecht)
  3. De Parel Heintje
  4. Hillegoms Tarwe Bier by Scheldebrouwerij ('s Gravenpolder)
  5. Horn's Wit by Bierbrouwerij "de 3 Horne" (Kaatsheuvel)
  6. Jonge Daen and Ouwe Daen
  7. Korenwolf by Gulpener Bierbrouwerij (Gulpen)
  8. Kroon Oirschots Witbier by Bierbrouwerij "De Kroon" (Oirschot)
  9. La Strada (from Goes)
  10. Leeuw Valkenburgs Wit and WinterWit
  11. Limburgse Witte by Sint-Jozef (Opitter; also by Martens in Bocholt, Belgium?)
  12. Maasland Witte Weiven
  13. Maximiliaan Speltbier (draught)
  14. Moerenburg by Bierbrouwerij Tilburg
  15. Texels Wit by Texelse Bierbrouwerij
  16. Theater Wit by Ambachtelijke Brouwerij "De Griffioen"
  17. Titje
  18. Waags (from Amsterdam)
  19. Weizener
  20. Wieckse Witte by De Ridder in in Maastricht; now owned by Heineken
  21. Willibrordbier (from Utrecht)
  22. Witte Raaf (cans and draught)
  23. Witte Wieven (Wit; and pineapple) by Maasland Brouwerij (Oss)
  24. Wit Voetje by De Bockaar
  25. Zeeuwsche Witte by Bierbrouwerij De Halve Maan (Hulst)

Denmark:

There seems to be some confusion about Danish wheat beers. A few modern types are called Hvede, which undeniably means wheat, and some also use the Bavarian or Belgian names weisse or wit; most of these also seem to be derived from Bavarian/Belgian types. There are also several indigenous "Hvidt" (white) beers, unique to Denmark ("a remainder of the pre-lager Danish brewing tradition" / "often used in cooking and as a thirst quencher ... was earlier the most common beer in Denmark"). However, although these are described on several websites as 'wheat' beers, I have been informed that "Danish Hvidtøl has absolutely nothing to do with wheatbeer". This particular correspondent described it to me as follows:

Hvidtøl is a low-alcohol dark beer and is very sweet in its taste, and it has a complete different tradition and history. Hvidtøl was made in the old days when people believed in ferrys [N.B. despite there being a common variety called skibsøl, i.e. 'ship's ale', I don't think he means 'booze cruise' vessels such as the infamous Saturday-evening boat from Copenhagen to Malmö... but fairies!]. At Christmas time they made this "Hvidtøl" and apart from drinking it, they layed it on the roof to the ferry who lived in the house. Now people don't believe in ferrys anymore of course [too many bridges?], but now it is "that beer" children in Denmark start to drink. Most Danish children loves Hvidtøl.

The name "Hvidt" is quite ironic, as many varieties are dark. It comes from the fact that this be er is made from "white malt", i.e. malt barley harvested before it matures properly and changes colour from white to green. This presumably accounts for the low alcohol content (which incidentally makes it tax free) and its suitability for children (like Malzbier in Germany or Root Beer in the USA); indeed, in the middle ages it was generally recommended to drink Hvidtøl rather than water. It still has strong associations with particular seasonal festivities. Hvidtøl is generally said to come in four varieties -- Lyst (Pale), Mørkt (Dark), Jule (Christmas) and Påske (Easter) -- but it is not yet clear to me how the Christmas/Easter types differ from the others (maybe the Christmas Ale contains even more sugar?). A Danish friend says that the most popular variation is called Nisseøl ("Santa's Elf's beer"); while the Net-Etiket website lists many more historical varieties: Hvidtøl no. 1, 2 & 3; Skattefri, Kroneøl, Juleøl, Påskeøl, Skibsøl, Bitterøl, Lystøl, and Wienerøl.

The website has pictures of lots of Hvidtøl labels and also some background information, but unfortunately my Danish is not yet good enough to understand all of it, and only the front page is available in English. The only workable free online Danish machine translation site I found did not make much sense of the other pages. For information in English, try Danish Breweries. For good measure, here are a few links to Hvidtøl breweries:

Here now follows the list of genuine Danish wheat beers:
  1. Apollo Lys Weissbier, draught
  2. Brøckhouse Hvede, Wit (draught)
  3. Carlsberg Hvede (draught only) pic1
  4. Nørrebro Stuykmann Witt (wit)
  5. Ørbæk Weissbier
  6. Refsvindinge Enkens Anden Lyst (wit)
  7. Semper Ardens Weisse (Hefe with apple) by Carlsberg; only available in 30 restaurants
  8. Tuborg Classic Hvede pic1 pic2

Sweden:

  1. Örbräu Dunkles Hefeweizen #1, Hefeweizen #2 ("homebrew"!)
  2. Grodans Veteöl, ("homebrew"!)
  3. HD Wit, ("homebrew"!)
  4. Jämtlands Weiss President (draught)
  5. Munkbo Kristall (also draught, "3.5", "6.8")
  6. Nynäshamn Yttre Gaarden (draught)
  7. Slottskällan Vrak (recovered from a 1915 shipwreck) and Vit (also draught)

Finland:

  1. Karjala Weizenfest
  2. Koff Weizze
  3. Arguably, also Sahti

France:

  1. Amadeus Bière Blanche (also? in 50cl and 5 litre cans)
  2. Blanche du Mont Blanc
  3. Britt Blanche
  4. L'Aiguille Blanche
  5. Moulins D'Ascq
  6. Uberach Bière Blanche

Switzerland:

  1. BFM (la Salamandre / la Torpille)
  2. Falken Munot Weizen
  3. La Tana del Luppolo, formerly a.k.a. Birreria Ticinese
  4. Locher Appenzeller Bio-Weizen (organic)
  5. Sierrvoise Blanche
  6. Wädenswiler Ur-Weizen (organic); also Hanf Lady, the first beer (Weizenbier?) specially designed for ladies (i.e. without hops, but with hemp);

Austria:

(see also Netbeer, Austrian Breweries and Der Brauereiführer)

  1. Weizerl by Altwirt (Hefe, Bock)
  2. Argus (Hefe)
  3. Bayrische Weisse
  4. Bogner (Hefe, Dunkel); smallest brewery in Austria
  5. Braukunsthaus (Dunkel)
  6. Brigitta (Hefe)
  7. Diewald (Light)
  8. Dombräu (Hefe, Bock)
  9. Edelweiss (Hefe, Kristall, Dunkel, Radler, Bock [Gamsbock])
  10. Faistenauer (Hefe, Dunkel)
  11. Fassl (Hefe)
  12. Fischer (Hefe)
  13. Fohrenburg (Hefe)
  14. Frankenmarkter (Hefe)
  15. Gerstl Sommerweiße (Hefe)
  16. Goldberg (Hefe)
  17. Highlander Unser Weizen (Hefe)
  18. Hirt (Hefe)
  19. Huber Hefeweizen (Hefe, Dunkel); from St Johann in Tirol; not to be confused with the German or American varieties...
  20. Isi-Bräu (Hefe)
  21. Jörger (now Grieskirchner) (Hefe, Kristall, Dunkel)
  22. Kellerbräu (Hefe)
  23. Kemmet (Hefe)
  24. Kirchbräu (Hefe)
  25. Malzinger's (Hefe)
  26. Moorgeheimnis Weissbier liqueur (25%)
  27. Murauer (Hefe)
  28. Neuwirth (Hefe)
  29. Nöckl Sommerweizen, Weizenbockbrand (spirit made from distilled Weizenbock!)
  30. Petri (Hefe)
  31. Raggei (Hefe, Dunkel)
  32. Ried (Hefe, Dunkel)
  33. Sajacher Schlössl (Hefe)
  34. Salm Bräu (Hefe)
  35. Ennstaler Schnee Weiße (Hefe)
  36. Stadl (Hefe); probably the highest brewery in Europe (1280m)
  37. Staffelmayr (Dunkel)
  38. Starkenberg (Hefe, Dunkel)
  39. Schlossbräu (Hefe)
  40. Schmankerlhof (Hefe, Dunkel, Bock)
  41. Schmaranz (Dunkel)
  42. Schmieden (Hefe)
  43. Schnaitl Bayern-Weisse (Hefe, Dunkel)
  44. Brauerei Fritz Schneeberger wheat beer-only brewery; yet another 'Schnee-Weisse' (Hefe)
  45. SimalWeizen (Hefe)
  46. s'Kloane Brauhaus Die Weisse (Hefe)
  47. Stiegl Weizengold (Hefe, Dunkel)
  48. St Georgs (Hefe)
  49. Mühlviertler by ThorBräu (Hefe, Dunkel); there are unconfirmed reports that Brauerei Hofstetten (Austria's oldest brewery) was the first to make a Mühlviertler Weißbier, and some evidence that there was also a Bavarian Mühlviertler...
  50. Theresien (Hefe)
  51. Trumer a.k.a. Sigl; (Hefe, Dunkel, Kristall); used to make Weizengold Hefe/Dunkel/Champagner (Kristall) but the name passed to Stiegl
  52. Vitzthum (Hefe, Dunkel)
  53. Die Weisse Another wheat beer-only brewery; good website, includes their own basic recipe for making Weizen (Hefe, Dunkel, Bock, seasonal Lent beer, etc.)
  54. Wieden (Hefe)
  55. Wolfsbräu (Hefe)
  56. Zum Alfons

Hungary:

  1. Ilzer (Hefe, Kristall, Dunkel) -- very similar to the Bavarian style; from Monor

Poland:

Only one traditional brand, now extinct, and one new microbrewery? Considering that "the most common drink in mediaeval Poland was wheat beer", that's rather sad...

  1. Piwo Grodziskie (smoked), from Grodzisk near Poznan; found on web in: UNESCO literature site, and newspaper site...
  2. Spiż Brewery

Czech Republic:

  1. Gambrinus Bílé
  2. Herold Psenicné (Hefe)

Ukraine:

  1. Pshenychne Etalon -- Brewed in Kiev with Munich technology, and available worldwide in beautiful presentation packs. In 2004 it won the gold medal for "South German-Style Hefe-Weissbier" at the World Beer Cup, and "Best Wheat Beer" at the Brewing Industry International Awards (see also BIIA 2004).

Lithuania:

  1. Gubernija Kvietinis Baltas Alus
  2. Švyturys Baltas Kvietinis Alus

Croatia:

  1. Medvedgrad Dva Klasa (pšenièno pivo)

Russia:

  1. Bochkarev Wheat Special (Hefe) [old English site]
  2. Baltika (Hefe)

Italy:

  1. Birrificio Italiano B.I. Weizen (draught)
  2. Cittavecchia Weizen
  3. La Baladin Isaac
  4. L'Officina della Birra "La Weizen dell'Officina" and "La Speciale dell'Officina", both "from Monaco" (?)
  5. Panil Blanche According to MaxBeer, Weizen seems to be readily available in Italy (possibly due to large numbers of German tourists?).

Corsica:

  1. Pietra Colomba (with strawberry tree, myrtle, cistus, and juniper).

Greece:

  1. Craft (Hefe); in Athens

Israel:

  1. Asif Blonda Prua

Mexico:

  1. Bohemia Weizen
  2. Casta Triguera by Especialidades Cerveceras S.A. de C.V.

America:

  1. 19th Hole Ale by Custom BrewCrafters
  2. 3 Sisters Golden Wheat by Krogh's Restaurant and Brewpub
  3. Abita Wheat (Hefe) and Purple Haze (raspberry)
  4. Ale Smith (Weizenbock)
  5. Alexander Keith's Light Ale by Keith's Brewery
  6. Allagash White (Wit) by Allagash Brewing
  7. Anacortes American Wheat by Anacortes Brewery and Rockfish Grill
  8. Anchor Summer Beer by Anchor Brewing
  9. Autumn Harvest (Dunkel) by Chelsea Brewing
  10. Baltika #8 Wheat by Baltika Brewery
  11. Barley's Boulder Gold (Hefe); Henderson, NV
  12. Belgian Wheat by Beartooth Brewing
  13. Berghoff Hefeweizen and Solstice Wit (a Bavarian-style Wit?!) by Huber
  14. Big Hole Mythical White Grand Cru
  15. Big Wind (Hefe, Dunkel); Hartford, CT
  16. Blitz-Weinhard
  17. Blueberry Wheat (and Honey Wheat?) by Brimstone Brewing; Baltimore, Maryland
  18. Blue Moon (Wit) by Coors
  19. Blue Ridge by Frederick Brewing (now defunct); Frederick, Maryland
  20. Blue Star Great American Wheat Beer by North Coast Brewing
  21. Brooklyn Brewery (Hefe, Dunkel, Doppelbock, Blanche; all draught/keg only)
  22. Buffalo Butt (Dunkel) by Yellow Rose Brewing
  23. Calistoga Wheat by Calistoga Inn Restaurant & Brewery
  24. Calypso by Avery Brewing
  25. Carmacks Gold by Skagway Brewing
  26. Celis White (Witbier; also draught); Austin, TX
  27. Chasing Tail Ale by Buckhead Brewery and Grill
  28. Chuck Wheat Ale by Smuttynose Brewing
  29. Climax Wheat by Beer Works
  30. Clipper City (Honey); Baltimore, Maryland
  31. Clipper Gold (Hefe) by Maritime Pacific Brewing
  32. Cranberry Wheat (Dunkel / Wit?) by Valley Forge Brewing
  33. Curim Gold Celtic Wheat Beer by Carlow Brewing
  34. Dark Horse Sapient Summer Wheat
  35. DeGroen's (Bock); Baltimore, MD
  36. Desert Wheat; Moreno Valley, CA
  37. Eat a Peach ; Mount Airy, MD (not sure if I should recommend this, based on the reviews here
  38. El Dorado Brewing, Stockton, CA: pale wheat, Black & Tan "brown ale" (60% wheat, 40% stout)
  39. Fireweed (Honey) by Midnight Sun Brewing
  40. Foggy Bottom by Olde Heurich Brewing
  41. Fredericksburg Edelweiss Wheat Ale (draught)
  42. Grace House (Honey) by Wagner Valley Brewery
  43. Granite Creek (Kristall) by Prescott Brewing
  44. Grant's Weis Beer
  45. Grassfire Wheat by Hook & Ladder Brewing
  46. Grasshopper by Big Rock Brewery
  47. Gritty McDuff's Summer Wheat by Gritty McDuff's Brewing
  48. Gudenteit (Hefe) by Mickey Finn's Brewery
  49. Half Ton (Hefe) by Thomas Kemper Brewing
  50. Happy Valley (Hefe) by Desert Edge Brewery
  51. Harley (Honey) by Charlie & Jake's Brewery & Grille
  52. Harvest Wheat by Flying Goose Brewpub & Four Corners Grill
  53. Harvester Wheat Ale by Coach's Restaurant And Brewery
  54. Heartland Brewery Harvest Wheat by Heartland Brewery Union Square
  55. Heavenly (Hefe) by Heavenly Daze Brewery & Grill
  56. Hefeweizen by Moose's Tooth Pub and Pizzeria
  57. Henry Weinhard's Hefeweizen by Miller
  58. High Desert (Hefe) by Bend Brewing
  59. High Rollers, Anderson Valley, CA
  60. Hocus Pocus by Magic Hat Brewing
  61. Honey Wheat by Mill Bakery, Eatery & Brewery
  62. Honeymoon Wheat by Coeur d'Alene Brewing, Idaho
  63. Huckleberry Wheat by Pend Oreille, Idaho
  64. Independence Wheat by Maplewood Farms Brewery & Restaurant
  65. Independence Wheat Ale by Berkshire Brewing
  66. Ironman Wheat by Southend Brewery & Smokehouse
  67. Kelly's Southern Clipper by Kelly's Caribbean Bar, Grill & Brewery
  68. Leatherneck Wheat Beer by Shenandoah Brewing
  69. Legend Brewing (Hefe; seasonal)
  70. Leinenkugel's Berry Weiss, Honey Weiss and Sunset Wheat
  71. Lemongrass Wheat by Outer Banks Brewing Station; Kill Devil Hills, NC
  72. Light Lager by Main Street Brewery / Turoni's Pizza
  73. Lilikoi Wheat Ale by Kona Brewing
  74. Liquid Sunshine by Rock Bottom Restaurant & Brewery
  75. Live Oak Brewing, Austin, TX: Hefe Weizen
  76. Lost Coast Great White Beer
  77. Macfarlane Brewing, Phoenix, AZ: (Hefe)
  78. Market Street Wheat by Bohannon Brewery / Market Street Brewery
  79. Mason Jar Marzen by Thomas Kemper Brewing
  80. Michelob (Hefeweizen, Bavarian Style Wheat) pic
  81. Monte Carlo Winner's Wheat by Monte Carlo Casino and Brewpub
  82. Mt St Helena (Honey), Middletown, CA
  83. Naked Aspen (Honey) by Aspen Beer
  84. New Glarus Solstice, Belgian Red and Raspberry Tart (Wisconsin; widely recommended; first US brewery founded by a woman)
  85. New World Wheat by Redwood Coast Brewing / Tied House Cafe & Brewery
  86. Nitro Wheat by Shipyard Brewing
  87. Nor'wester (Hefe) by Saxer Brewing / Nor'wester Beer
  88. Northwest Wheat by Bear Creek Brewing / Northwest Brewhouse and Grill
  89. Oaken Barrel Razz Wheat (raspberry), King Rudi (Hefe); Indiana
  90. Oberon Ale by Kalamazoo Brewing / Eccentric Cafe
  91. Odell Easy Street Wheat by Odell Brewing
  92. Oregon (Hefe)
  93. Overland (Wit) by Overland Stage Stop Brewery
  94. Oxford Raspberry Wheat (also draught), White Ox; Linthicum, Maryland; now brewed by Clipper City
  95. Ozark Brewing, Fayetteville, AK: "Horseshoe Hefe-weizen"
  96. Penn (Hefe); Pittsburgh, PA
  97. Pete's Honey Wheat / Pete's Wicked Summer Brew (Hefe) -- no longer seems to be available on their slow, Flash-heavy website?
  98. Pike Weisse by Pike Pub and Brewery
  99. Pub Draught by Rock Bottom Restaurant & Brewery
  100. Pyramid (Hefe / Bock / Apricot / Amber); by Pyramid Breweries, Seattle, WA (formerly Hart Brewing, Kalama); served on tap in some airline lounges
  101. Ramstein (Hefe / Kristall / Dunkel) by High Point Wheat Beer (the only wheat beer-only brewery in North America) Butler, NJ
  102. Raspberry Wheat by Colorado Brewing
  103. Raspberry Wheat by Oldenberg Brewery
  104. Raw Wheat; Topeka, KS
  105. Red Ass (Honey), Fort Collins, CO
  106. Red Brick Summer Brew by Atlanta Brewing
  107. Redhook (Hefe) by Redhook Ale Brewery
  108. Red Rock (Wit)
  109. Rogue 'n' Berry (marionberry); also "Mom Hefeweizen" (but it's a Witbier!)Newport, Oregon
  110. Ruby Raspberry Wheat Ale by Mad Anthony Brewing
  111. St Arnold (Kristall) by Saint Arnold Brewing
  112. St Stan's Brewing, Modesto, CA: Graffiti Wheat (seasonal)
  113. Samuel Adams ("Summer Ale" = Wit / "Winter Lager" = Bock, Weiss Bier)
  114. Saranac Pilsener by the Matt Brewing
  115. Saxer Three Finger Hefedunkel
  116. Schlafly (Hefe)
  117. Shawano Gold by Slab City Brewing
  118. Shiner (Hefe / Honey / "Winter Ale" = Dunkel) by Spoetzl Brewery; in Shiner, near San Antonio, TX
  119. Shipyard Winter Ale (Special Brew) by Shipyard Brewing
  120. Sierra Nevada (Hefe) pic
  121. Smuttynose Belgian Style White Ale
  122. Snipes (Hefe) by Snipes Mountain Microbrewery & Restaurant
  123. Snoweizen by Snowshoe Brewing
  124. Southport Hefe Weizen by Southport Brewing
  125. Spartan Wheat by Harper's Restaurant & Brewpub
  126. Spring Street (Witbier), New York
  127. Squatters (Hefe) by Utah Brewers Cooperative
  128. Station Master Wheat Ale by Flossmoor Station Restaurant & Brewery
  129. Steamworks Dunkelweizen
  130. Stoddard's (Kristall)
  131. Summer Breeze Wheat Ale by Wachusett Brewing
  132. Summer Brew by Mill City Brewing
  133. Summer Wheat by Old Nutfield Brewing
  134. Summer Wheat Ale by Otter Creek Brewing
  135. Sundance (Hefe), Palmer Lake, CO
  136. Sunshine Wheat (Wit) by New Belgium Brewing
  137. Sweetwater Blue by Sweetwater Brewing
  138. Tabernash (Hefe / Dunkel); Denver, CO: brewmaster Eric Warner wrote book German Wheat Beer (see above) + sponsored Wheat Beer category in US National Homebrew Competition
  139. Telenn Du (Dunkel) by Brasserie Lancelot
  140. Teton Huckleberry Wheat by Grand Teton Brewing
  141. Thor's Wild Wheat by Valhalla Microbrewery & Restaurant
  142. Typhoon Winter Wheat by Typhoon Restaurant & Brewery
  143. UFO (Hefe) by Harpoon Brewery
  144. Upland Wheat Ale; Bloomington, IN
  145. Viking Fest Summer Ale by Thomas Kemper Brewing; Seattle, WA
  146. Wall Street Wheat by Mishawaka Brewing
  147. Watergap Wheat by Appalachian Brewing
  148. Wedding Wheat by Maplewood Farms Brewery & Restaurant
  149. Weimaraner Wheat by Basil T's Brew Pub and Italian Grill
  150. Weiss Guy; by Alcatraz Brewing, Indianapolis, IN
  151. Weizen by Sonora Brewing
  152. Weizen Crème Stout by Table Rock, Boise, Idaho
  153. Weizenheimer by Portsmouth Brewery
  154. Whale Of A Wheat by North Rock Brewing
  155. Wheat by Amsterdam Brewing
  156. Wheat Beer by Durango Brewing
  157. White Mountain Weasel Wheat by Woodstock Inn Station & Brewery
  158. White River Wheat by Hubcap Brewery & Steakhouse
  159. Whitewater Wheat Ale by Great Divide Brewing / Trout River Brewing
  160. Wickham Wheat by Charlie & Jake's Brewery & Grille
  161. Widmer (Hefe; most popular wheat ale in USA?)
  162. Widow Maker Wheat by Rockslide Brewery & Pub
  163. Widow White's Brew by Old Saddleback Brewing
  164. Wheatland Wheat Beer, Michigan
  165. Wildcat Wheat by Little Apple Brewing
  166. Wild Goose Spring Wheat Ale by Frederick Brewing (now defunct)
  167. Wild Pitch (Weizenbock), Denver, CO
  168. Wild River Brewing's Oregon Blackberry Porter, Raspberry Wheat, Hefeweizen, Weizenbock, etc.
  169. Willow Wheat by Prescott Brewing
  170. Windy Gap Wheat by Smoky Mountain Brewery
  171. Wit Amber / Black / White Ale
  172. Wixa Weiss by Wynkoop Brewing
  173. Wollochet Bay Wheat by Harmon Restaurant & Brewery
  174. Wood Duck Wheat by Pioneer Brewing
  175. Woody's American Wheat by Watson Bros. Bistro & Brewery
  176. Workingman's Wheat by Amherst Brewing
  177. Victory (Philadephia): Sunrise (Hefe), Moonglow (Weizenbock) and Whirlwind (Witbier)
  178. Vino's, Little Rock, AK: "Rainbow Wheat"
  179. Yardbird Wheat by Big Time Brewery & Alehouse
  180. Ybor Calusa Wheat by Ybor City Brewing
  181. ZÔN (Wit) and Unfiltered Wheat by Boulevard Brewing

Canada:

  1. Agassiz Brewing, Winnipeg: "Harvest Haze" (Hefe with 50% wheat; yeast from Weihenstephan)
  2. Bière d'Été
  3. Big Rock: Grasshopper Ale (Kristall)
  4. Blanche de Chambly by Unibroue
  5. Denison's (draught Hefe, Miami Weisse, Raspberry Wheat) - now back in business
  6. Dieu du Ciel! Nativité Blonde (draught)
  7. Kawartha Lakes Brewing (KLB: now defunct): Raspberry Wheat pic
  8. Le Cheval Blanc (Blanche / Coup de Grisou / Death Valley / Rescousse)
  9. Niagara Falls Weisse; the celebrated Maple Wheat (with maple syrup) is no longer produced :-(
  10. Sailor Hägar's Belgian Wit Ale
  11. Schoune Blanche de Québec
  12. Wheat by Upper Canada Brewing

Australia:

  1. Cascade Summer Blonde, from Abbotsford
  2. Matilda Bay Redback Original, from Freemantle

New Zealand:

  1. Emerson's (Hefe / Dunkel)

South Africa:

  1. Fransen Street Wheat Beer

UK:

  1. Belhaven
  2. Clockwork (draught)
  3. Clouded Yellow (Hefe; with vanilla, cinnamon, etc.; available ONLINE) pic
  4. Cornish Blonde
  5. Dr Sunshine from Eddie Gadd's Ramsgate Brewery
  6. Harviestoun Belgian White (draught)
  7. Heather Ale (Grozet: with gooseberries ; Craigmill Summer Wheat: draught)
  8. Hop Back (Summer Lightning / Thunder Storm: 50% barley, 50% wheat) pic
  9. King and Barnes (Wheat Mash)
  10. O'Hanlon's (Hefe)
  11. Pitfield No. 1 (organic, vegan, and available in 32-pint polypins and 72-pint casks!) pic
  12. Raspberry Wheat from Whitstable Brewery
  13. Rebellion White
  14. Ruddles pic
  15. St Peter's (Hefe / elderberry / grapefruit)
  16. Salopian (Gingersnap -- with ginger , Jigsaw -- black wheat beer) pic pic
  17. Sainsbury's (Hefe, "brewed in Hof" -- possibly by Scherdel?; also four-packs of "Bavarian Style Wheat Beer" and "Raspberry Wheat Beer")
  18. Somerfields (cans; "brewed in Bavaria")
  19. Sparkling Wit from Fenland Brewery
  20. Spiced Vice and Summer Haze, both by Brighton's "Dark Star" Brewing. Their tantalizing offer of a Wheat Beer Weekend seems (judging by the dates) to be either 1999 or 2004...
  21. Tesco (Hefe; "brewed in Northern Bavaria"; available ONLINE)
  22. Usher's White Ale 1998
  23. Waitrose (Hefe / Dunkel; "brewed near Plattling in castle brewery dating from 1567")

Ireland:

  1. Curim Gold Celtic Wheat Beer (also draught)
  2. Dwan's Harvest Gold (draught)
  3. Maeve's Crystal The first demonstrably vegan Weizen! :-) pic
  4. Friar Weiße (produced by the Franciscan Well Brewery in Cork. No apparent connection with Franziskaner, but some links with 'Wheinstephaner' [sic] and 'Weinstephan' [sic] in 'bavaria' [sic].)

China:

  1. Huiquan Beer by the Fujian Huiquan Brewery Group
  2. BTA (Brautechnisch Akademin Wuhan) (brand 中心啤酒)

Japan:

Japan seems to be experiencing a (long overdue) boom in interesting beers, and Weizen too has become much easier to find. In October 2000 I had some in the Yuiga-Doxon restaurant in Furano, which I suspect was a local Furano brew (bottled) although I have yet to confirm this.
  1. Sapporo Weizen (cans) [No longer in production ... regrettably.]
  2. Miyamori Local Beer (Sold in their restaurant in Iwate, and ONLINE.)
  3. Ginga Kogen Beer ("(was) brewed in Nasu, about 50 km north of Utsunomiya. Sold in wonderful blue 500ml bottles and also in cans. Also sold in one restaurant in Utsunomiya, selected shops -- and online.") [Company bankrupt]
  4. Hitachino Nest (Weizen / Wit) by Kiuchi Brewery
  5. Shonan Weiss Beer ("One of the better examples of a Weizen [...] at Sagamiya Saka-ten [in Kamakura].")
  6. WAOH Weizen ("One of the best Japanese microbrew examples of the classic German weizen [...] on tap at Popeye Bakushu Club in Ryogoku.")
  7. "Romantic Mura" near Utsunomiya also allegedly has a Weizen, although this is not mentioned on the Japanese microbreweries site.
  8. Imported German Weizen can be found in a few locations, e.g. Japan's largest beer shop in Nishi-Magome, Tokyo (600+ varieties: see pic). See the list of imported beer shops in Tokyo ... Also worth looking (on the same site) at the list of Tokyo Brewpubs and Beer Bars, as many apparently serve Weizen both imported and domestic. Kuroneko Yamato offer a "mail order from Europe" service which includes Schneider Weisse Original (pic) but at a horrific price!

Tegestology

In addition to Weizenbier labels, I collect beer mats -- an art going by the name of tegestology. I have a few thousand (including a "membership mat" from the British Tegestology Society, and one certifying the collection when it stood at 500), but regrettably very few relating to wheat beers ... For what it's worth, the largest collections of beer mats and labels listed in the Guiness Book of Records are 150,000 and 425,000 respectively!


Links

Not surprisingly, there are plenty of Web pages devoted to beer in general. The Campaign for Real Ale is a good place to start; Henry's Beer Links are also worth a look; and a large variety can also be found on or via RealBeer.com). An ever-increasing number of American sites have information on micro-breweries (e.g. an Oregon beer festival featuring several wheat beers) or homebrew recipes, including an incredible wealth of Weizen derivatives (try The Cat's Meow and/or BeerStyles.Com). Pa's Bier has several excellent and entertaining pages about wheat beer, with an Austrian / American slant. White Beer Travels has many wonderful pages full of historical and scientific detail about Belgian witbier and others, while Lambic and Wild Ale goes into modern attempts to develop the lambic style further.

If you want opinions on how Weizenbier tastes, try Epicurious. If you'd prefer to taste them for yourselves, various UK suppliers offer good selections by mail order, although they may not have a quick turnover (so check the "best before date" on each bottle when they arrive). I'd also recommend searching for your beer online (or downloading a full list etc.) then phoning up to order. Try: Beers of Europe (large variety: get the PDF file), Barrels & Bottles (not much variety, but cheap!), Majestic Wine (free delivery, but only if you order 4+ cases). The Beer Cellar in Norwich also offers wheat beer selection packs by mail order (but not online; the prices in this picture are almost certainly out of date). The Swan and Rushes pub in Leicester also has a truly excellent selection.

Finally, there are comprehensive sites at (surprisingly enough) www.bier.de, www.germanbeerguide.co.uk and www.netbeer.org.

There used to be only one other web page on tegestology (now at www.zumbo.ch/mats), but now there are apparently several dozen, best found via this Open Directory Project list.

Last, and certainly not least, have a look at Saké World for some insights into another fascinating beverage. I don't really mean the Saké, I mean Shōchū: a wonderful Japanese spirit which, as Weizen was a decade ago, is very hard to find in the U.K. (if you can read Japanese, it is available by mail order from the Rice Wine Shop). I was tempted to start a Shōchū Site to match this Weizen Web, but John got there first. :-)

Erdinger and Thurn & Taxis labels


This page produced by Ben Jones, originally in 1995. Last update 2010. Home page / Contact me